Troilus and Cressida | Critical Essay by Grace Tiffany

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Troilus and Cressida.
This section contains 5,297 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Grace Tiffany

Critical Essay by Grace Tiffany

SOURCE: “Not Saying No: Female Self-Erasure in Troilus and Cressida,” in Texas Studies in Literature and Language, Vol. 35, No. 1, Spring, 1993, pp. 44-56.

In the following essay, Tiffany asserts that Cressida has been misread by most critics as either reprehensible or victimized, when in fact she is the product of a patriarchal culture still present today that misunderstands women who do not communicate forcefully.

One half of me is yours, the other half yours, Mine own, I would say; but if mine, then yours, And so all yours. 

—Portia, The Merchant of Venice III.ii.16-181

Like Shakespeare's Trojans and Greeks, scholarly evaluators of Shakespeare's Cressida divide themselves into two warring camps that only seem radically opposed. In fact, both camps share a common perspective and language that produce a disturbing vision of woman as passive...

(read more)

This section contains 5,297 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Grace Tiffany