Troilus and Cressida | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 48 pages of analysis & critique of Troilus and Cressida.
This section contains 12,977 words
(approx. 44 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Barbara Hodgdon

SOURCE: “He Do Cressida in Different Voices,” in English Literary Renaissance, Vol. 20, No. 2, Spring, 1990, pp. 254-86.

In the following essay, Hodgdon refers to several different stage adaptations of Troilus and Cressida to demonstrate how the play was constructed to keep Cressida in particular, and, through her representation, Renaissance women in general, under male control.

When Trojan Hector visits the Greek camp, Troilus and Cressida represents his meeting with Achilles as an exchange of male gazes, powerful speaking looks through which each constructs, or attempts to deconstruct, the identity of the other:

Achilles. Now, Hector, I have fed mine eyes on thee; I have with exact view perused thee, Hector, And quoted joint by joint. … Hector. Stand fair, I prithee; let me look on thee. Achilles. Behold thy fill. Hector.                                         Nay, I have done already. Achilles. Thou art too brief. I will the second time, As I would buy...

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This section contains 12,977 words
(approx. 44 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Barbara Hodgdon
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Critical Essay by Barbara Hodgdon from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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