Troilus and Cressida | Literature Criticism Gayle Greene

This literature criticism consists of approximately 22 pages of analysis & critique of Troilus and Cressida.
This section contains 6,467 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
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Gayle Greene

SOURCE: "Shakespeare's Cressida: 'A Kind of Self'," in The Woman's Part: Feminist Criticism of Shakespeare, edited by Carolyn Ruth Swift Lenz, Gayle Greene and Carol Thomas Neely, University of Illinois Press, 1980, pp. 133-49.

In the essay that follows, Greene argues that Cressida, by basing her identity on male desires and definitions, becomes "the sum total of 'opinions' of men whose opinions are in themselves societally determined, and she is thus only a representative of her world. "

"Let it not be believ'd for womanhood!"

That human nature is not "natural," but is, rather, shaped by social forces and values, is an understanding we have long had in relation to men but one which has been more difficult to grasp with regard to women. Troilus and Cressida may seem...

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This section contains 6,467 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Gayle Greene