Salem witch trials | Critical Essay by John Putnam Demos

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Salem witch trials.
This section contains 5,963 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by John Putnam Demos

SOURCE: "Accusers, Victims, Bystanders: The Inner-life Dimension," in Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England, Oxford University Press, Inc., 1982, pp. 153–212.

In the following excerpt, Demos explores the role of female autonomy, menopause, menarche, and anorexia nervosa in the Salem witchcraft crisis.

"Every man is in certain respects: (a) like all other men, (b) like some other men, (c) like no other man."1

This simple yet profound observation, offered many years ago by two eminent social scientists, can be pressed into service in the present context. In certain respects the disposition of individual New Englanders toward witchcraft was quite idiosyncratic. In others it was common to particular groups, large or small. And in still others it touched matters of species-wide significance.

The present chapter deals with psychological issues at the group level. For the most...

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This section contains 5,963 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Putnam Demos
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