Salem witch trials | Critical Essay by Lyle Koehler

This literature criticism consists of approximately 33 pages of analysis & critique of Salem witch trials.
This section contains 9,754 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lyle Koehler

SOURCE: "The Salem Village Cataclysm: Origins and Impact of a Witch Hunt, 1689–92," in A Search for Power: The "Weaker Sex" in Seventeenth-Century New England, University of Illinois Press, pp. 383–417.

In the following excerpt, Koehler discusses the issues of empowerment and non-traditional behavior in examining why a disproportionate number of the accused witches and their accusers were female.

An Epidemic of Witchcraft

… The Salem Village witch mania began easily enough, when several young girls experimented with fortune-telling and read occult works. In late January 1692, these girls began creeping under chairs and into holes, uttering "foolish, ridiculous speeches," assuming odd postures, and, on occasion, writhing in agony. Their antics soon became full-fledged hysterical fits. Their tongues extended out to "a fearful length," like those of hanged persons; their necks cracked; blood "gushed plentifully out of their Mouths." A local physician named William Griggs, unable...

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This section contains 9,754 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lyle Koehler
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Lyle Koehler from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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