Salem witch trials | Critical Essay by Nicholas P. Spanos and Jack Gottlieb

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Salem witch trials.
This section contains 5,121 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Nicholas P. Spanos and Jack Gottlieb

SOURCE: "Ergotism and the Salem Village Witch Trials," Science, Vol. 194, No. 4272, December, 1976, pp. 1390–94.

In the following excerpt, Spanos and Gottlieb offer a rebuttal to Linda R. Caporael's thesis, examining the symptoms of the participants in the Salem witchcraft trials, but finding no evidence that convulsive ergotism played a role in the crisis.

In a recent article in Science (1) it was suggested that the residents of Salem Village, Massachusetts, who in 1692 charged some of their neighbors with witchcraft did so because of delusions resulting from convulsive ergotism. The author of the article, L. R. Caporael, argued that (i) the general features of the Salem crisis corresponded to the features of an epidemic of convulsive ergotism, (ii) symptoms manifested by the girls who were the principal accusers were those of ergot poisoning, (iii...

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This section contains 5,121 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Nicholas P. Spanos and Jack Gottlieb
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