Treasure Island | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of Treasure Island.
This section contains 4,408 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Max Sutton

SOURCE: "Jim Hawkins and the Faintly Inscribed Reader in Treasure Island," in Cahiers Victoriens and Edouardiens, No. 40, October, 1994, pp. 37-47.

In the following essay, Sutton examines the tone and style of the narrative voice of Treasure Island. He argues that Stevenson employed confessional techniques through which he "invites the reader to become a friend, a partner in [a relationship between equals."]

"It takes," says Thoreau, in the noblest and most useful passage I remember to have read by any modern author, "two to speak truth—one to speak and one to hear."

Stevenson, "Truth of Intercourse" (1879)1

Many readers have felt the power of Treasure Island, but no one can quite explain it. Who could account for the effect upon an eight-year-old boy who begged to read one more chapter at bedtime and then, before the lights went out, asked his parents to take the book downstairs? Much as...

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This section contains 4,408 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Max Sutton
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Critical Essay by Max Sutton from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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