Treasure Island | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of Treasure Island.
This section contains 6,790 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sister Mary Louise McKenzie

SOURCE: "The Toy Theatre, Romance, and Treasure Island: The Artistry of R. L. S.," in English Studies in Canada, Vol. VIII, No. 4, December, 1982, pp. 409-21.

In the following essay, McKenzie examines the influence of the nineteenth-century toy theatre upon Stevenson's aesthetic sensibility. She focuses on elements of excitement, imagination, chance, and playfulness in both the toy theatre and Stevenson's fiction.'

Treasure Island, a six-part romance first published in a boys' paper, has been charming readers as a kind of archetypal adventure tale for a century. Its rapid but1 predictable incidents, swashbuckling characters, and exotic settings combine with the enthusiasm of the young narrator to create the impression of a youthful day-dream rather than a serious quest. The story's2 apparent naivete, however, conceals interesting elements of the author's carefully considered ideas about art and life that were then influencing his developing literary theories. Its construction also foreshadows in...

(read more)

This section contains 6,790 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sister Mary Louise McKenzie
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Sister Mary Louise McKenzie from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook