Angels in America | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 54 pages of analysis & critique of Angels in America.
This section contains 14,827 words
(approx. 50 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Allen J. Frantzen

SOURCE: Frantzen, Allen J. “Alla, Angli, and Angels.” In Before the Closet: Same-Sex Love from “Beowulf” to “Angels in America,” pp. 264-92. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998.

In the following essay, Frantzen examines the representation of Anglo-Saxon identity in Angels in America in terms of Kushner's sexual identity politics.

Rome, not Northumbria, is the center of The Man of Law's Tale, and celibacy, not marital bliss, is the Man of Law's preferred mode for Christ's holy ministers. Chaucer's text looks neither to the vernacular tradition of married clergy that the Wycliffites sought nor to the celibate clerical world demanded by Roman canon law and espoused earlier by the Anglo-Saxon church of Ælfric and by Norman reformers. Instead, the Man of Law's heroine is a product of Chaucerian compromise. She practices what might be thought of as serial chastity. Custance marries Alla, but after she becomes pregnant she lives...

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This section contains 14,827 words
(approx. 50 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Allen J. Frantzen
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Critical Essay by Allen J. Frantzen from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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