The Lord of the Rings | Critical Essay by C. N. Manlove

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of The Lord of the Rings.
This section contains 3,194 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
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[The Lord of the Rings] came just when disillusion among the American young at the Vietnam war and the state of their own country was at a peak. Tolkien's fantasy offered an image of the kind of rural conservationist ideal or escape for which they were looking (it also could be seen as describing, through the overthrow of Sauron, the destruction of the U.S.). In this way The Lord of the Rings could be enlisted in support of passive resistance and idealism on the one hand and of draft-dodging and drugs on the other. A second factor may have been the perennial American longing for roots, a long-tradition and a mythology: these things are the fibre of Tolkien's book, where every place and character is lodged at the tip of an enormous, growing stem of time. (p. 157)

Tolkien's intention in his book was...

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This section contains 3,194 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by C. N. Manlove
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by C. N. Manlove from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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