This Boy's Life | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of This Boy's Life.
This section contains 1,356 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Richard Eder

SOURCE: Eder, Richard. “The Boy Lost, the Writer Found.” Los Angeles Times Book Review (8 January 1989): 3, 6.

In the following review, Eder discusses Wolff's childhood and argues that, as a memoir, This Boy's Life is both artful and courageous.

“The first thing in life is to assume a pose. What the second is, no one has yet discovered.”

Oscar Wilde's remark is the epigraph to Tobias Wolff's memoir of growing up. On the surface, it is a suitable choice. Wolff masked and masqueraded his way through a childhood and adolescence that might otherwise have unhinged him.

More deeply, though, it is the opposite of suitable: and far better. This Boy's Life does not consort with its Wildean epigram: it wrenches it apart.

Wolff is the author of artful and highly crafted stories. The art in this memoir is its nakedness. It is...

(read more)

This section contains 1,356 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Richard Eder
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Review by Richard Eder from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook