To Kill a Mockingbird | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of To Kill a Mockingbird.
This section contains 1,159 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Rob Atkinson

SOURCE: Atkinson, Rob. “Comment on Steven Lubet, ‘Reconstructing Atticus Finch.’” Michigan Law Review 97, no. 6 (May 1999): 1370-72.

In the following essay, Atkinson responds to the essay “Reconstructing Atticus Finch,” by Steven Lubet. Atkinson argues that, taking To Kill a Mockingbird on its own “childishly simplistic” moral terms, Atticus Finch is certainly a role model. However, Atkinson concludes that the book is a less complex and morally challenging novel than it is given credit for.

Professor Lubet has joined a growing list of revisionists who question Atticus's standing as the paragon of lawyerly virtue [in To Kill a Mockingbird,].1 But Professor Lubet takes revisionism in a distinctly postmodern direction, if not to a radically new level. Atticus's previous critics have wondered how he could have overlooked, perhaps even condoned, the pervasive racism, sexism, and classism of...

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This section contains 1,159 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Rob Atkinson
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Critical Essay by Rob Atkinson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.