To Kill a Mockingbird | Critical Essay by Steven Lubet

This literature criticism consists of approximately 38 pages of analysis & critique of To Kill a Mockingbird.
This section contains 11,389 words
(approx. 38 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Steven Lubet

Critical Essay by Steven Lubet

SOURCE: Lubet, Steven. “Reconstructing Atticus Finch.” Michigan Law Review 97, no. 6 (May 1999): 1339-62.

In the following essay, Lubet questions the standard perception of Atticus Finch as a role model for lawyers. Lubet provides an analysis of the trial portrayed in To Kill a Mockingbird from the perspective of today's legal defense methods and ethics, particularly in regard to rape trials.

I. Introduction

Atticus Finch.

No real-life lawyer has done more for the self-image or public perception of the legal profession than the hero of Harper Lee's novel, To Kill a Mockingbird.1 For nearly four decades, the name of Atticus Finch has been invoked to defend and inspire lawyers, to rebut lawyer jokes, and to justify (and fine-tune) the adversary system. Lawyers are greedy. What about Atticus Finch? Lawyers only serve the rich. Not Atticus Finch. Professionalism is...

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This section contains 11,389 words
(approx. 38 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Steven Lubet