Titus Andronicus | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 29 pages of analysis & critique of Titus Andronicus.
This section contains 7,667 words
(approx. 26 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Emily Detmer-Goebel

SOURCE: Detmer-Goebel, Emily. “The Need for Lavinia's Voice: Titus Andronicus and the Telling of Rape.” Shakespeare Studies 29 (2001): 75-92.

In the following essay, Detmer-Goebel concentrates on the rape and silencing of Lavinia as it depicts the male repression of women's authority in Titus Andronicus.

In Act 2 of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus, Lavinia refuses to name rape; she refers to an impending sexual assault as that which “womanhood denies my tongue to tell” and as a “worse-than-killing lust” (2.3.174, 175).1 Lavinia's chaste refusal to say the word “rape” reminds the audience that even to speak of rape brings a woman shame. As feminists have pointed out, an environment that makes it shameful to speak of rape disallows a critique of rape and the culture that sustains it.2 And yet, while the world of the play suggests how early modern culture's construction of gender “denies” a woman the “tongue” to talk of rape, the...

(read more)

This section contains 7,667 words
(approx. 26 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Emily Detmer-Goebel
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Emily Detmer-Goebel from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook