Titus Andronicus | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Virginia Mason Vaughan

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Titus Andronicus.
This section contains 5,812 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Virginia Mason Vaughan

Critical Essay by Virginia Mason Vaughan

SOURCE: “The Construction of Barbarism in Titus Andronicus,” in Race, Ethnicity, and Power in the Renaissance, edited by Joyce Green MacDonald, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1997, pp. 165-180.

In the essay below, Vaughan analyzes the way in which the Romans of Titus Andronicus—who commit barbarous acts—are compared with the barbarians they have conquered. Vaughan contends that the play reveals the anxieties of Shakespeare's time regarding England's own role as a colonizer.

1

Marcus chides his brother in the opening scene of Titus Andronicus for refusing to bury his son Mutius inside the family tomb:

Thou art a Roman; be not barbarous: The Greeks upon advice did bury Ajax That slew himself; and wise Laertes' son Did graciously plead for his funeral. Let not young Mutius then, that was thy joy, Be...

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This section contains 5,812 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Virginia Mason Vaughan