Titus Andronicus | Critical Essay by Bernice Harris

This literature criticism consists of approximately 33 pages of analysis & critique of Titus Andronicus.
This section contains 9,817 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Bernice Harris

SOURCE: “Sexuality as a Signifier for Power Relations: Using Lavinia, of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus,” in Criticism, Vol. 38, No. 3, Summer, 1996, pp. 383-407.

In the following essay, Harris focuses on Lavinia’s role as the currency used in the play's political exchanges, observing that the treatment of her body serves as a means of identifying the source of authority in Titus Andronicus.

One of the most gruesome images of a woman on the Elizabethan stage occurs when Lavinia, in Shakespeare's early Roman play, Titus Andronicus, enters the stage, according to stage directions, with “her hands cut off, and her tongue cut out, and ravished” (at the opening of Act II, Scene 4).1 Of course, the literary canon is strewn with dismembered or ravished women's bodies; Lavinia is one of many. An argument often made...

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This section contains 9,817 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Bernice Harris