Titus Andronicus | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 33 pages of analysis & critique of Titus Andronicus.
This section contains 8,438 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sara Eaton

SOURCE: “A Woman of Letters: Lavinia in Titus Andronicus,” in Shakespearean Tragedy and Gender, Indiana University Press, 1996, pp. 54-74.

In the following essay, Eaton suggests that through Lavinia, Shakespeare dramatized contemporary social tensions concerned with the value of humanist education. In particular, Eaton contends, Lavinia embodies the upper-class, humanist-educated woman who is perceived as a societal threat and who must consequently be silenced.

                                                                                          I will learn thy thought; In thy dumb action will I be as perfect As begging hermits in their holy prayers. Thou shalt not sigh, nor hold thy stumps to heaven, Nor wink, nor nod, nor kneel, nor make a sign, But I, of these, will wrest an alphabet, And by still practice learn to know thy meaning. 

—(3.2.39-45)

Titus speaks to Lavinia in my epigraph, and he terms her a “map of woe” whose body must “talk in signs” (3.2.11), since, as Marcus puts it...

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This section contains 8,438 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sara Eaton
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Critical Essay by Sara Eaton from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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