Timon of Athens | Lecture by W. H. Auden

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Timon of Athens.
This section contains 5,387 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Lecture by W. H. Auden

Lecture by W. H. Auden

SOURCE: Auden, W. H. “Timon of Athens.” In Lectures on Shakespeare, edited by Arthur Kirsch, pp. 255-69. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2000.

In the following essay, constructed from lectures delivered in 1946 and 1947, Auden calls Timon a “pathological giver” whose giving is motivated by selfishness and a desire to feel superior to others. The critic contends that when Timon's power—his ability to give—is taken away, he falls into “a state of powerless hatred.”

Timon of Athens is an interim work between the great tragedies and the last batch of Shakespeare's plays, which are usually known as the romance comedies. It is rash to draw inferences from an author's works about his life. Timon is not a personal work, as Hamlet may be. The five...

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This section contains 5,387 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Lecture by W. H. Auden