Timon of Athens | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 27 pages of analysis & critique of Timon of Athens.
This section contains 6,423 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by A. D. Nuttall

SOURCE: "Timon Furibundus," in Timon of Athens, Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1989, pp. 70-89.

In the following essay, Nuttall examines Timon's descent into misanthropy, beginning with Act III, scene iv, when the main character is confronted by his creditors, and concluding with the start of Act IV, scene Hi, when he exiles himself in the woods.

Towards the end of III. iv, the creditors close in on Timon's door. Lucius says:

Methinks he should the sooner pay his debts,
And find a clear way to the gods.
                                       (III. iv. 74-5)

In this derisive speech the word 'clear' moves from its financial sense ('clear of debt') to a more elusive meaning, having affinities with 'clear conscience' and even, more simply, 'clear sky' so that it seems for a moment to hold out the possibility of another, better world. Even as the creditors move in there is shouting within and Timon emerges, as...

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This section contains 6,423 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by A. D. Nuttall
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Critical Essay by A. D. Nuttall from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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