James Thurber | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of James Thurber.
This section contains 359 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Nora Sayre

Encounters—with unfriendly food, or machinery, or objects that took on a life of their own—were essential to [James Thurber's] vision of human existence as an obstacle race. The Thurber man's feeling of helplessness when faced with collapsing cots, stalled cars, computers gone beserk, falling ceilings, malign plumbing, situations beyond control, marriages, ghosts in the attic and global war had to seem hilarious—since the author's own perception of chaos was sometimes unbearable. As Graham Greene wrote about Charlie Chaplin, "The man who falls downstairs must suffer if we are to laugh; the waiter who breaks a plate must be in danger of dismissal. Human nature demands humiliation, the ignoble pain and the grotesque tear: the madhouse for Malvolio." No one understood that better than James Thurber….

The kinship between wit and dejection always intrigued him; as he noted in the preface to My Life and Hard...

(read more)

This section contains 359 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Nora Sayre
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Nora Sayre from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.