James Thurber | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of James Thurber.
This section contains 490 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by David Montrose

SOURCE: Review of Selected Letters of James Thurber, in New Statesman, Vol. 103, No. 2655, February 5, 1982, p. 24.

This brief review faults the editors of this volume of letters for their selection criteria, calling the compilation disappointing.

Thurber was an inveterate letter writer from college days until his death in 1961. When his appalling eyesight became blindness in 1947, he simply resorted to dictation; even afterwards, friends still received occasional notes in his big scrawl. That the letters provide a valuable biographical source was amply recognised by Burton Bernstein, whose Thurber (1975) frequently resembles a collection of letters interspersed with commentary. This being so, devotees of—Twain perhaps excepted—America's greatest humorist will approach this selection with much anticipation, especially as they have waited 15 years since their last fix: the posthumous Thurber and Company. They are liable to be disappointed.

The editors cannot be blamed for the familiarity of these letters, nearly all of...

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This section contains 490 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by David Montrose
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Critical Review by David Montrose from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.