James Thurber | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of James Thurber.
This section contains 647 words
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SOURCE: "Laughter in the Dark," in New Statesman and Society, Vol. 2, No. 80, December 15, 1989, p. 37.

In contrast to unenthusiastic responses to Thurber's Collecting Himself, this review finds the collection a "luminous delight."

Trying to explain the mechanics of humour can be a dispiriting business. Analyse a poem and one's appreciation might be enriched; analyse a joke and something quite different happens, delicate ironies and clever nuances evaporate before your eyes, punch lines wither and die. "Humour can be dissected, as a frog can, but the thing dies in the process and the innards are discouraging to any but the pure scientific mind," was E B White's sage observation.

One fancies that a professional humourist would always guard the "secret" of his art, but White's friend and colleague James Thurber seemed genuinely interested in its disclosure, and arrived at a conclusion that touches us all on the raw: "Human dignity...

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This section contains 647 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Anthony Quinn
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Critical Review by Anthony Quinn from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.