James Thurber | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of James Thurber.
This section contains 2,109 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Melvin Maddocks

SOURCE: "James Thurber and the Hazards of Humor," in Sewanee Review, Vol. XCIII, No. 4, Fall, 1985, pp. 597-601.

This rapid overview of many of Thurber's most famous works aims to dispute Thurber's critical reputation as the foremost American humorist of his time.

While he was still alive, James Thurber was judged to be the best humorist since Mark Twain—if not something more. After calling him his "favourite humorist," T. S. Eliot weightily pronounced Thurber's writing and illustrations to be "a document of the age they belong to." Ernest Hemingway appeared on Thurber dustjackets, declaring that here was the "best writing coming out of America."

Nothing kills a soufflé like praising it in terms of a roast-beef dinner. The pleasures of Thurber are still there for the rereading, but one savors them moderately. The superlatives applied by Thurber's colleagues and contemporaries seem excessive to the point of embarrassment today...

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This section contains 2,109 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Melvin Maddocks
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Critical Essay by Melvin Maddocks from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.