Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 32 pages of analysis & critique of Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica.
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SOURCE: "Isaac Newton on Science and Religion," in Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. XXXI, 1970, pp. 521-42.

In the following essay, Austin maintains that there is little evidence to indicate that Newton's scientific ideas significantly influenced his theological writings. In practice, however, Newton may have conceded that science had some bearing on theology, despite his "maxim" that "religion and philosophy are to be preserved distinct."

In his own time Isaac Newton was known as an acute and learned theologian. Conduitt reports that "Archbishop Tenison offered him, if he would take orders, the Mastership of Trinity College when it was given to Montague, and importuned him to accept any preferment in the Church; saying to him: 'Why will you not? You know more divinity than all of us put together.'" (Newton put him off with the reply that he would "be able to do you more service...

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This section contains 9,532 words
(approx. 32 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William H. Austin
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