Theodore Roosevelt | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of Theodore Roosevelt.
This section contains 5,510 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Milton Cooper, Jr.

SOURCE: "Theodore Roosevelt: On Clio's Active Service," in The Virginia Quarterly Review, Vol. 62, No. 1, 1986, pp. 21-37.

In the following essay, Cooper traces Roosevelt's development as a historian.

The most casual visitor to Sagamore Hill, Theodore Roosevelt's home at Oyster Bay, cannot fail to grasp two of the owner's greatest interests. The most immediately striking impression of the interior of the house comes from the plethora of animal trophies—mounted heads, antlers, tusks, stuffed birds and small game, and elephants' feet made into footstools. Even someone who knows nothing about Theodore Roosevelt can see that he was an enthusiastic outdoorsman and an avid hunter. The next most striking impression is made by the books. Sagamore Hill is a house full of books. The library is one of the largest rooms, and a casual glance at the volumes, which come in all sizes and shapes and many of which show...

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This section contains 5,510 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Milton Cooper, Jr.
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Critical Essay by John Milton Cooper, Jr. from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.