The Winter's Tale | Barbara A. Mowat

This literature criticism consists of approximately 30 pages of analysis & critique of The Winter's Tale.
This section contains 8,929 words
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SOURCE: "Rogues, Shepherds, and the Counterfeit Distressed: Texts and Infracontexts of The Winter's Tale 4.3," in Shakespeare Studies: An Annual Gathering of Research, Criticism, and Reviews, Vol. XXII, 1994, pp. 58-76.

In the essay that follows, originally presented at the Shakespeare Association of America in 1991, Mowat explores act four, scene three of The Winter's Tale—where Autolycus is introducedas a dramatic moment in which the surface context and its "infracontexts" create a number of tensions that establish Autolycus as a rogue character.

As I look at a particular intertextual moment in The Winter's Tale (the scene in which we meet Autolycus), I begin by assuming that the first printing of the play in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio is a "text"—that is, dialogue initially crafted as a script for performance but nevertheless preserved for us as printed symbols, inked pages. I also assume that this...

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This section contains 8,929 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Barbara A. Mowat
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Literature Criticism Series
Barbara A. Mowat from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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