The Winter's Tale | Critical Essay by Lynn Enterline

This literature criticism consists of approximately 55 pages of analysis & critique of The Winter's Tale.
This section contains 16,219 words
(approx. 55 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lynn Enterline

Critical Essay by Lynn Enterline

SOURCE: “‘You speak a language that I understand not’: The Rhetoric of Animation in The Winter's Tale,” in Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 48, No. 1, Spring, 1997, pp. 17-44.

In the essay that follows, Enterline examines Shakespeare's interpretation of Ovidian and Petrarchan rhetoric as a means of discussing the role of power and the female voice in The Winter's Tale.

Between Leontes's opening imperative, “Tongue-tied our queen? Speak you” (1.2.28), and the final act, where Hermione as living statue returns to her husband yet says nothing directly to him, The Winter's Tale traces a complex, fascinated, and uneasy relation to female speech.1 A play much noted for interrogating the “myriad forms of human narration”2—old tales, reports, ballads, oracles—The Winter's Tale begins its investigation of language when Hermione...

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This section contains 16,219 words
(approx. 55 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lynn Enterline