The Two Noble Kinsmen | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 37 pages of analysis & critique of The Two Noble Kinsmen.
This section contains 9,785 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Mallette

SOURCE: “Same-Sex Erotic Friendship in The Two Noble Kinsmen,” in Renaissance Drama, Vol. XXVI, 1995, pp. 29-52.

In the following essay, Mallette investigates the play's exploration of love, friendship, desire, and marriage, asserting that the dramatists stress the ruin of same-sex desire rather than the ascendancy of marriage.

At the end of The Two Noble Kinsmen, having vanquished his cousin and friend Arcite in chivalric contest for the hand of Emilia, Palamon belatedly grasps the irony of his triumph:

                                                                                O cousin, That we should things desire which do cost us The loss of our desire! that nought could buy Dear love but loss of dear love! 

(5.4.109-12)

Palamon's bitter sense of the price of victory goes to the heart of the play's dilemma. The Two Noble Kinsmen makes strenuous efforts to balance competing sets of desires—in the cousins' case, between friendship and romantic love. But, as Palamon notes...

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This section contains 9,785 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Mallette
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Critical Essay by Richard Mallette from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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