The Turn of the Screw | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of The Turn of the Screw.
This section contains 5,747 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kevin Murphy

SOURCE: “The Unfixable Text: Bewilderment of Vision in The Turn of the Screw,” in Texas Studies in Literature & Language, Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter, 1978, pp. 538–51.

In the following essay, Murphy explores “some of the strategies James employs to prevent a consistent reading of the text.”

For ours is a most fictile world; and man is the most fingent plastic of creatures. A world not fixable; not fathomable!

—Carlyle, The French Revolution

Since its publication eighty years ago, The Turn of the Screw has enjoyed a double life. After Daisy Miller, perhaps James's most widely read piece of fiction, it has captivated readers, both naive and acute, as a tale of the grotesque in which a young and apparently good-hearted governess discovers the existence of ghosts at the country estate where she has been employed. Approached in a different fashion, however, it has equally captivated other readers as a revealing exemplum...

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This section contains 5,747 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kevin Murphy
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Critical Essay by Kevin Murphy from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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