The Turn of the Screw | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 37 pages of analysis & critique of The Turn of the Screw.
This section contains 9,814 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert Emmet Whelan

SOURCE: “Ordinary Human Virtue: the Key to The Turn of the Screw,” in Renascence, Vol. 40, No. 3, Spring, 1988, p. 247–67.

In the following essay, Whelan explores the governess's profound moral and spiritual crisis, maintaining that the ghosts of Peter Quint and Miss Jessel mirror the evil tendencies within the children and the governess.

“My hovering prowling presences, my pair of abnormal agents,” with their “dire duty of causing the situation to reek with the air of Evil,” is how Henry James describes the roles of Peter Quint and Miss Jessel. There is no doubt that James intends to “bring the bad dead back to life for a second round of badness,” and wishes to make these evil ones, “the haunting pair, capable … of everything—that is of exerting, in respect to the children, the very worst action small victims so conditioned might be conceived as subject to” (xxi). In any...

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This section contains 9,814 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert Emmet Whelan
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Critical Essay by Robert Emmet Whelan from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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