The Tenant of Wildfell Hall | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 31 pages of analysis & critique of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall.
This section contains 8,555 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Rachel K. Carnell

SOURCE: “Feminism and the Public Sphere in Anne Brontë's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall,” in Nineteenth Century Literature, Vol. 53, No. 1, June, 1998, pp. 1-24.

In the following essay, Carnell claims that The Tenant of Wildfell Hall does not challenge the traditional Victorian separation of men and women into public and domestic spheres.

The narrative structure of Anne Brontë's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (1848) has traditionally been criticized as a “clumsy” rupture in what might have been “a passionate and original love story.”1 By embedding Helen Graham's diary into an extended letter between her second husband and his brother-in-law, Brontë has presumably prevented a more natural scene of seduction in which Helen could have gradually revealed her story to Gilbert Markham face to face. This somewhat awkward split narrative has recently been reappraised as not a defect after all but rather as a conscious commentary on the intractable...

(read more)

This section contains 8,555 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Rachel K. Carnell
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Rachel K. Carnell from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook