The Tempest | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Alden T. Vaughan and Virginia Mason Vaughan

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of The Tempest.
This section contains 6,188 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alden T. Vaughan and Virginia Mason Vaughan

Critical Essay by Alden T. Vaughan and Virginia Mason Vaughan

SOURCE: "Caliban's Debut," in Shakespeare's Caliban: A Cultural History, Cambridge University Press, 1991, pp. 3-20.

In the excerpt below, the Vaughans discuss Caliban's physical features, his dramatic function, and the ambiguity of his characterization.

Caliban, a salvage and deformed slave.

The Tempest (names of the actors, 1623 Folio)

Caliban is the core of the play.

Frank Kermode (1954).

Caliban. In modern poetry he is a recurring symbol for the victimization of Third World peoples. In the theatre he can be anything the director imagines, from amphibian to punk rocker to black militant. Contemporary film shows him as the id: In Forbidden Planet he is Dr. Morbius's (Walter Pidgeon's) destructive impulse, ready to kill rather than be suppressed; in Paul Mazursky's adaptation Tempest, he (Raul Julia) is a...

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This section contains 6,188 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alden T. Vaughan and Virginia Mason Vaughan