The Tempest | Critical Essay by Philip C. McGuire

This literature criticism consists of approximately 32 pages of analysis & critique of The Tempest.
This section contains 9,330 words
(approx. 32 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Philip C. McGuire

SOURCE: "The Tempest: 'Something Rich and Strange'," in Shakespeare: The Jacobean Plays, St. Martin's Press, 1994, pp. 175-97.

In the following essay, McGuire emphasizes the essentially theatrical nature of The Tempest, and suggests possible interpretations of the textespecially of Antonio's silence at the endthat can be represented on stage but might not be apprehended by readers. He also points out unique or distinctive qualities of the work which include the unconventional deception of the audience, concern with the New World, observance of Neoclassical unities of time and place, and a heterogeneous mixture of sources.

No Shakespearean play uses music more extensively than The Tempest, widely regarded for more than one hundred and fifty years now as the final play Shakespeare wrote singlehandedly even though, as Stephen Orgel notes, there is no way to determine 'chronological priority' between it and The Winter's...

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This section contains 9,330 words
(approx. 32 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Philip C. McGuire
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