The Tempest | Critical Essay by James E. Phillips

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of The Tempest.
This section contains 6,227 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James E. Phillips

Critical Essay by James E. Phillips

SOURCE: Phillips, James E. “The Tempest and the Renaissance Idea of Man.” Shakespeare Quarterly 15, no. 2 (spring 1964): 147-59.

In the following essay, Phillips evaluates three principal figures of The Tempest—Caliban, Ariel, and Prospero—in terms of the Renaissance conception of the tripartite soul, divided into vegetative, sensitive, and rational spheres.

Most students of The Tempest are agreed that there is more to Shakespeare's last play than charms the eye and delights the ear.1 Some have regarded its deeper meaning as autobiographical in nature, communicating Shakespeare's view of his own art and announcing his withdrawal from active professional life. Others have found it a covert commentary on England's colonizing efforts in the New World, or more generally, on the impact of civilization on primitivism. Some have explained its significance in terms of Christian...

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This section contains 6,227 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James E. Phillips
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