The Tempest | Lecture by W. H. Auden

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of The Tempest.
This section contains 4,401 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Lecture by W. H. Auden

Lecture by W. H. Auden

SOURCE: Auden, W. H. “The Tempest.” In Lectures on Shakespeare, edited by Arthur Kirsch, pp. 296-307. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2000.

In the following essay, reconstructed from a 1947 lecture, Auden highlights the principal elements of The Tempest, including its mythopoeic quality, major themes, and representation of music.

The Tempest is the last play wholly by Shakespeare, written in 1611 at or before the time he retired to Stratford. He was later brought in as a collaborator in the writing of Henry VIII and The Two Noble Kinsmen. People have very naturally and in a sense rightly considered the play Shakespeare's farewell piece. Whether or not Shakespeare was conscious of it is irrelevant. I don't believe people die until they've done their work, and when they have, they die. There are surprisingly few incomplete works in art...

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This section contains 4,401 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Lecture by W. H. Auden
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