The Tell-Tale Heart | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 14 pages of analysis & critique of The Tell-Tale Heart.
This section contains 3,910 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by E. Arthur Robinson

SOURCE: "Poe's 'The Tell-Tale Heart,'" Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Vol. 19, No. 4, March, 1965, pp. 369-78.

In the following essay, Robinson provides a general overview of major themes in the story and focuses upon its dramatization of "self destruction through extreme subjectivity."

Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" consists of a monologue in which an accused murderer protests his sanity rather than his innocence. The point of view is the criminal's, but the tone is ironic in that his protestation of sanity produces an opposite effect upon the reader. From these two premises stem multiple levels of action in the story. The criminal, for example, appears obsessed with defending his psychic self at whatever cost, but actually his drive is self-destructive since successful defense upon either implied charge—of murder or of criminal insanity—automatically involves admission of guilt upon the other.

Specifically, the narrator bases his plea upon the assumption that madness...

(read more)

This section contains 3,910 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by E. Arthur Robinson
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by E. Arthur Robinson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook