The Taming of the Shrew | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Ann Blake

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of The Taming of the Shrew.
This section contains 6,677 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ann Blake

Critical Essay by Ann Blake

SOURCE: Blake, Ann. “The Taming of the Shrew: Making Fun of Katherine.” Cambridge Quarterly 31, no. 3 (2002): 237-52.

In the following essay, Blake argues that the critical reputation of The Taming of the Shrew has suffered because its comedic elements have often been considered farcical.

In The Sense of Humor Stephen Potter remembers in his youth discovering his ‘first free contemporary’ laugh in Shakespeare. This was when the ‘Hotspur humour’ plays on ‘the humourless Glendower’:

GLEN.
I can call spirits from the vasty deep. 
HOTS.
Why, so can I, or so can any man, 
But will they come when you do call for them? 

(1 Henry IV III. i. 52-4)1

Potter's reaction to Hotspur's quip, or to others like it, is no doubt a common experience of early theatre-going...

(read more)

This section contains 6,677 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ann Blake