The Taming of the Shrew | Critical Essay by Katherine A. Sirluck

This literature criticism consists of approximately 27 pages of analysis & critique of The Taming of the Shrew.
This section contains 7,994 words
(approx. 27 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Katherine A. Sirluck

Critical Essay by Katherine A. Sirluck

SOURCE: “Patriarchy, Pedagogy, and the Divided Self in The Taming of the Shrew,” in University of Toronto Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 4, Summer, 1991, pp. 417-34.

In the following essay, Sirluck argues that The Taming of the Shrew satirizes Elizabethan patriarchal society.

Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew has been read and directed in a variety of ways. It has been seen as a rollicking comic flyting match between a resourceful suitor and a dangerous man-hater.1 Some productions have encouraged the idea that Katharina secretly longs for a man too strong for her, one who can awaken her true feminine nature. A more contemporary form of this view has recently been championed by Ralph Berry, who perceives Katharina's reluctance in marrying Petruchio as merely ‘ostensible,’ and sees a romantic ‘union of hearts and minds...

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This section contains 7,994 words
(approx. 27 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Katherine A. Sirluck