The Song of Hiawatha | Critical Essay by Helen Archibald Clarke

This literature criticism consists of approximately 45 pages of analysis & critique of The Song of Hiawatha.
This section contains 13,405 words
(approx. 45 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Helen Archibald Clarke

Critical Essay by Helen Archibald Clarke

SOURCE: “The Lore of Hiawatha,” in Longfellow's Country, The Baker and Taylor Co., 1909, pp. 177-225.

In the following essay, Clarke delves into the background legends and stories that inspired Longfellow's poem and describes how the poet adapted and changed them.

In turning to Indian stories for subject-matter for his poetry, Longfellow has done our literature a lasting service by adopting into it an entirely new range of folk-lore. It is often remarked that we can never have a distinctively American literature because we have no folk-lore of our own. Where is the culture-race that does possess a folk-lore exclusively its own? The French writers have either harked back to the classics or adopted the legends of Normandy or Brittany; the English writers have either harked back to the classics or adopted Celtic and Welsh...

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This section contains 13,405 words
(approx. 45 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Helen Archibald Clarke
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