The Seagull | Critical Essay by Burton Kendle

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of The Seagull.
This section contains 1,370 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: Kendle, Burton. “The Elusive Horses in The Sea Gull.Modern Drama 13 (May 1970): 63-6.

In the following essay, Kendle analyzes Chekhov's use of references to horses in The Seagull.

An elaborate refrain emerges from the apparently random requests for horses in The Sea Gull. As they try, usually unsuccessfully, to secure the horses that promise escape from the boredom and spiritual imprisonment of Sorin's estate, Chekhov's characters deepen the resonance of this refrain. The motif of unavailable horses is introduced humorously as merely another example of the steward Shamreyeff's blundering tyranny over his social superiors, a theme familiar in Chekhov's early plays and still effective in the butler's comic, yet touching, despotism over the weak-witted Protheros in Mary McCarthy's The Group. Though a half-foolish, half-pathetic figure in his nostalgia for the theater of his youth, Shamreyeff rules his domain absolutely. Indeed...

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This section contains 1,370 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Burton Kendle
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Burton Kendle from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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