Dylan Thomas | William Empson, Bernard Heringman, and John Unterecker

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of Dylan Thomas.
This section contains 4,173 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
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William Empson, Bernard Heringman, and John Unterecker

SOURCE: "Three Critics on One Poem: Hart Crane's 'Voyages III'," in Essays in Criticism, Vol. XLVI, No. 1, 1996, pp. 16-27.

In the following commentary, which was written in 1948 but not published until 1996, Empson, Heringman, and Unterecker analyze the "consanguinity" of the narrator's lover and the sea in Hart Crane's poem "Voyages III."

Infinite consanguinity it bears—
This tendered theme of you that light
Retrieves from sea plains where the sky
Resigns a breast that every wave enthrones;
While ribboned water lanes I wind
Are laved and scattered with no stroke
Wide from your side, whereto this hour
The sea lifts, also, reliquary hands.
And so, admitted through black swollen gates
That must arrest all distance otherwise,—
Past whirling pillars and lithe pediments,
Light wrestling there incessantly with light,
Star kissing star through wave on wave...

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This section contains 4,173 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Suzanne Ferguson