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Falstaff | Literature Criticism The Prince's Dog: Falstaff and the Perils of
Speech-Prefixity

This literature criticism consists of approximately 64 pages of analysis & critique of Falstaff.
This section contains 19,152 words
(approx. 64 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Prince's Dog: Falstaff and the Perils of Speech-Prefixity

Harry Berger, Jr., University of California, Santa Cruz

Throughout the two Henry IV plays, from his first appearance in the second scene of Part 1, Falstaff knowingly collaborates with Harry on the scenario entitled "The Rejection of Falstaff," subplot of "The Return of the Prodigal Son." Harry's resounding "I know thee not, old man" near the end of Part 2 (5.5.47) fulfills the scenario he entertained in the "I know you all" soliloquy that concluded the second scene of Part 1 (1.2.189-211).1 But Falstaff had already anticipated the scenario, alluding to it several times during conversations leading up to the soliloquy. Consider, for example, his sanctimonious parody at 1.2.89-96:

O, thou hast damnable iteration, and art indeed able to corrupt a saint. Thou hast done much harm upon me, Hal, God forgive thee for it...

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This section contains 19,152 words
(approx. 64 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Prince's Dog: Falstaff and the Perils of Speech-Prefixity
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