The Phoenix and the Turtle | Critical Essay by Murray Copland

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of The Phoenix and the Turtle.
This section contains 3,146 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Murray Copland

Critical Essay by Murray Copland

SOURCE: Copland, Murray. “The Dead Phoenix.” Essays in Criticism 15, no. 3 (July 1965): 279-87.

In the following essay, Copland claims that The Phoenix and Turtle is a “sad, searching, tender, human, and humane” meditation on the death of Truth and Beauty, and reproaches interpretations that mystify or sentimentalize the poem.

The Phoenix was a striking bird on three counts: (a) its beauty, (b) its uniqueness, and (c) its self-resurrecting habit.

In Shakespeare's poem The Phoenix and Turtle the attribute (a) is prominently present:

Truth and Beautie buried be. 

Here Truth = the Turtle, and Beautie = the Phoenix.

As for (b), Robert Chester, whose Love's Martyr prescribed the bare postulates for the poem, had introduced a personal variation of a certain imaginative power. The usual Phoenix is complete in itself; Chester's requires a mate, and finds...

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This section contains 3,146 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Murray Copland
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