Coriolanus | Literature Criticism The Noble Thing and the Boy of Tears: Coriolanus and the Embarrassments of Identity

This literature criticism consists of approximately 44 pages of analysis & critique of Coriolanus.
This section contains 13,023 words
(approx. 44 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Noble Thing and the Boy of Tears: Coriolanus and the Embarrassments of Identity

Burton Hatlen, University of Maine at Orono

Tonally, Coriolanus is Shakespeare's coolest tragedy. The protagonist does not invite audience identification—if anything, he spurns our sympathy. But the play treats his antagonists no less coolly. As a consequence, audiences and critics have often seen the play as working not so much upon our passions as upon our analytic faculties.1 But what questions does the play address? In our century, many critics have seen the play as turning on political issues. For some of these critics, the key issue is the struggle, whether in ancient Rome or in Jacobean England, between opposing social classes, noble and plebeian, or the relationship of the "great man" to the people, while other critics have argued that the play problematizes the very concept of the &#x...

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This section contains 13,023 words
(approx. 44 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Noble Thing and the Boy of Tears: Coriolanus and the Embarrassments of Identity