The New Yorker | Literature Criticism Stanley Edgar Hyman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of The New Yorker.
This section contains 2,657 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
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Stanley Edgar Hyman

SOURCE: "The Urban New Yorker," in The New Republic, Vol. 107, No. 3, July 20, 1942, pp. 90-2.

As a longtime literary critic for the New Yorker, Hyman rose to a prominent position in American literature during the middle decades of the twentieth century. He is noted for his belief that much of modern literary criticism should depend on knowledge received from disciplines outside the field of literature, and many of his critical essays rely on theories gleaned from such disciplines as cultural anthropology, psychology, and comparative religion. In the following excerpt, he provides an overview of the writers and editorial features that characterized the New Yorker in 1942.

There is no other magazine quite like The New Yorker, which is perhaps just as well. There is a Rural New Yorker, but it is an unabashed farm paper, and will not be mentioned in this review again...

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This section contains 2,657 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Stanley Edgar Hyman
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