The New Yorker | Scott Donaldson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of The New Yorker.
This section contains 2,369 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
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Scott Donaldson

SOURCE: "The New Yorker, Old and New," in The Sewanee Review, Vol. LXXXIII, No. 4, Fall, 1975, pp. 676-85.

Donaldson is an American critic and educator who has written several studies of twentieth-century American literary figures, including Ernest Hemingway and John Cheever. In the following excerpt from a review of several books about the New Yorker, Donaldson examines changes in the magazine's content and editorial policies over the years.

The dust jacket of Here at The New Yorker, with its cartoon gallery of thirty-six of the magazine's present and past luminaries, promises much the sort of anecdotal reminiscence that Brendan Gill delivers within. But there is only one cartoon of Gill himself, which hardly suggests how ponderously he bulks in his own version of the New Yorker's history. To some extent this is inevitable, for Gill is after all a survivor, having labored among the cubicles on West...

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This section contains 2,369 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Scott Donaldson
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