The Moor's Last Sigh | Critical Review by Brad Hooper

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of The Moor's Last Sigh.
This section contains 245 words
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Critical Review by Brad Hooper

SOURCE: A review of The Moor's Last Sigh, in Booklist, Vol. 92, No. 5, November 1, 1995, p. 435.

In the following review, Hooper describes The Moor's Last Sigh as "a marvelously wrought novel, guaranteed to entrance."

Rushdie's first novel since the fateful Satanic Verses (1989) is about hybridization of cultures, and itself seems a hybrid between William Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County novels and The Thousand and One Nights. This four-generational family saga takes place in Rushdie's native southern India and witnesses the decline of a spice-trading dynasty, a century-long drama of "family rifts and premature deaths and thwarted loves and mad passions and weak chests and power and money and the even more morally dubious seductions and mysteries of art." The fanciful tale is related by the last of the exhausted family line, Moraes Zogoiby, son of a pair of Indians of far different backgrounds and persuasions, his father Jewish and a Mob leader in Bombay, his mother Catholic and celebrated for her artistry. The "Moor," as he is called, was born physically precocious; in fact, he ages at twice the normal rate. The plot does not unfold—it floods like a river gone over its banks, exploding with incredible events and larger-than-life characters, and to be carried along is to ride beautiful prose through the colliding and conjoining of races and religions that have gone into the making of the fabric of Indian history and culture. A marvelously wrought novel, guaranteed to entrance.

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This section contains 245 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Brad Hooper