The Moor's Last Sigh | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of The Moor's Last Sigh.
This section contains 1,115 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Sara Maitland

SOURCE: "The Author Is Too Much with Us," in Commonweal, Vol. CXXIII, No. 3, February 9, 1996, pp. 22-3.

In the following review, Maitland suggests that The Moor's Last Sigh suffers from the fallout of the fatwa imposed upon its author.

Salman Rushdie is—and I think this can be said fairly uncontroversially—one of the most important English-language novelists currently writing. He has mythologized all our lives, and done so in the arena of multiculturalism and postmodernism. This is a remarkable achievement; and of course cannot be separated, in some important respects, from his own social boundary transgressions—he is the product of both a divided India and the British Public School system: Gandhi and Tom Brown's School Days; of Islam and the Booker Prize. Autobiography however is not the whole story—Rushdie has an extraordinarily bold imagination, in relation to both subject matter and plot and to language—as...

(read more)

This section contains 1,115 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Sara Maitland
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Review by Sara Maitland from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook