The Moor's Last Sigh | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Nina Barnton

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of The Moor's Last Sigh.
This section contains 1,511 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Nina Barnton

SOURCE: "Sentenced to Death but Recalled to Life," in The New York Times, January 17, 1996, pp. C1-2.

In the following essay, based on an interview with the author, Barnton describes Rushdie's life since the fatwa.

London, Jan. 11—Having lunch with Salman Rushdie means being prepared for the unexpected. First, there's the caller from Scotland Yard who arranges the meeting but refuses to mention the author by name, simply instructing you to bring a copy of The New York Times to a rendezvous in the lobby of a London hotel.

Next, there's the bodyguard who checks your identification and walks you over to a second hotel and up a back staircase, where a secret knock admits you to a suite guarded by three plainclothes policemen. Finally, there is the meeting with the author...

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This section contains 1,511 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Nina Barnton