The Minister's Black Veil: A Paradigm | Critical Essay by E. Earle Stibitz

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of The Minister's Black Veil: A Paradigm.
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SOURCE: “Ironic Unity in Hawthorne's ‘The Minister's Black Veil,’” in American Literature, Vol. 34, No. 2, May, 1962, pp. 182-90.

In the following essay, Stibitz maintains that Hawthorne used irony in his portrayal of the minister's decision to wear the black veil.

Because Hawthorne is always very much the same and yet also surprisingly varied, one way of understanding “The Minister's Black Veil,” as with any Hawthorne tale, is to read it not only as the unique work of art that it is, but as a tale comparable to others by Hawthorne, viewing it in the context of his essentially consistent thought and art as a whole. Such a reading of “The Minister's Black Veil” yields an unambiguous meaning. Hawthorne, with his usual assumption of the reality of personal evil, presents on one...

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This section contains 3,562 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by E. Earle Stibitz
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by E. Earle Stibitz from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.